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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening -- Robert Frost

Another old favourite...
(Poem #155) Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
 Whose woods these are I think I know,
 His house is in the village though.
 He will not see me stopping here,
 To watch his woods fill up with snow.

 My little horse must think it queer,
 To stop without a farmhouse near,
 Between the woods and frozen lake,
 The darkest evening of the year.

 He gives his harness bells a shake,
 To ask if there is some mistake.
 The only other sound's the sweep,
 Of easy wind and downy flake.

 The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
 But I have promises to keep,
 And miles to go before I sleep,
 And miles to go before I sleep.
-- Robert Frost
Like most of Frost's poems, 'Stopping By Woods' can be read on several
levels[1]. And, again like most of his poems, you can ignore them all, and
still enjoy the surface meaning, which is beautifully evocative. Just below
the surface there is the sleep/death metaphor, and the undercurrent of
gentle longing for death tinges the surface with a melancholy that
reinforces and plays off the night and winter images.

Formwise, note the predominance of soft, sibilant sounds, evoking the 'sweep
of easy wind and downy flake'. Note also the lovely rhyme scheme[2], aaba
bbcb, and the repetition of the final line, which provides closure at
several different levels.

[1] some of them incredibly contrived and/or ingenious - load up
<[broken link] http://faculty.millikin.edu/~moconner.hum.faculty.mu/e110/frost1.html> and
search for Matthew Brown, e.g.

[2] yes, yes, he rhymed 'sleep' with 'sleep'. get over it :)

For more than you ever wanted to know about Frost's life and works, see the
previous poem, poem #51

m.

382 comments: ( or Leave a comment )

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TROY MARTIN said...

this is my favorite poem. I always imagine the beautiful woods with the snow falling from the sky. I admire the man for thinking of his obligations when the lovely woods is so tempting. I can always see the horse in my mind giving his harness bells a shake.

Kydd Neal said...

Mr Frost, writing on snow... visits the mood of silent cold and slewed time
rather acutely.
For here the seasons of life move as winter shadows us - times wake leaves
in its path the more of nothingness... for snow, as life, melts away. And
only few of us realise that someone is watching....

Mslibertyjr said...

I love this poem. This is my favorite out of all poems. I can relate to it
and love to review it especially when hard troubles set in my life. I am a
journalist and write some things as to what Robert Frost wrote. That poem
always touches me deeply to not give up but to move on for there are things
still to be done. Thanks for displaying his poem, I have been searching for
it for quite some time now and have finally found it.

Thanks again,

Karen A.

Carolee Marano said...

Rhyming "sleep" with "sleep" is NOT without design in this poem, and in fact, it is the resonating power of it. It is the repetition of this line, "and miles to go before I sleep," bringing us to the conclusion of the poem, that awakens in us, who are so inclined to feel it, a strong identification with the profound power of our resignated acceptance of our responsibilities - our responsibilty to trudge on, our responsibility to live. In this sense, the poem is more about life than death. It is melancholy, evocative, true, and beautiful.

Dep8vn said...

This poem is a favorite of mine and I think it nice that you have a website
for it. Thanks!

Frank Rogers said...

Dear Sir or Madam,
This profound poem is about our lost connection with the natural world. Our ego bound activities take over our entire adult life. No time to appreciate the natural world. No time for activities that have no specific reason to admire nature. Even the horse senses there is something wrong with stopping in these woods because the horse is trained by humans.
"...promises to keep.." is the abiding theme of all of our lives as urban dwellers and it is very, very sad.
Frank Rogers

KStiles19 said...

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening in a great example of poetry. It is
good for all ages. The first 4 lines are my favorite! Matt Stiles (14)

Rhonda said...

This is a very evocative poem and has haunted me for a number of years as I
had only heard the the last verse. It has taken me a long time to look it up
and now that I have the rest of the poem is not a disappointment. It seems
to be about the hypnotically-deep, quiet, draw of dark nature over the
responsibility of human busyiness of everyday living. Of being lost in
wonder stareing at a blade of grass.

William Mino said...

This is one of my favorite poems. Debbie Mino

Deceptivedevices said...

Hello my name is Elaine and I stumbled across this website referring to
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening and was wondering if u could help me with
finding a website that dealt with critical analysis of this piece by Robert
Frost.. Any kind of links would help me immensely..
Thanks so much
Love on ya
Elaine

Hotfema said...

this poem has always reminded me of that old song, the boys of summer. times
is fleeting, blah, blah blah. my comments dont matter.

Herder Leland -AES said...

I've always loved this poem and "The Road
Not Taken". I have both Frost poems committed
to memory.

I also love Simon & Garfunkel's version of
the same sentiment: that we should all slow
down and smell the coffee or appreciate those
intangible, minute things in life, like the beauty of
a snow-filled woods, and not let the stresses
and tangible problems of life get us down. In
their song, "The 59th Street Bridge Song...
Feelin' Groovy", the man is faced with the
same situation, only in Frost's poem, the man
DOES realize that he "has promises to keep",
and moves on to his business dealings in the
city..."before he can sleep".

DuffManOohYa said...

elaine-you had a post asking people if they had any links to a website on the
critical analysis of the poem stopping by the woods on a snowy evening by
robert frost....i was wondering if you ever got any websites and if you did could
you send them to me? any site would be helpful thanks

Umama Saleem said...

i like it, its my fav. from all the ones comeing in my test n need help my e-mail address is if any of u cud help me plz do send me smthg with the subject of woods
amina

Elena Filipova said...

this poem is about santa claus!!

Missy03185 said...

did youever find the critical analysis of stopping by the woods on a snowy
evening

terryken said...

This is my all-time favorite poem. There is nothing more magical than
being out in the woods at night with snowflakes cascading down on you. I
recently visited New Hampshire and got to visit Robert Frost's home and
walk through his woods. It was magical to be right where he used to be!

Jason Pope said...

Robert Frost's poem is actually about a gentleman contemplating
suicide. The first image of the blanket of snow, the death shroud,
covering everything invokes the reader into participating in the
speaker's unnoticed and unseen death. Why would you want someone there
to stop you if you really were going to do that? The horse notices
something's wrong and that it's only the speaker and himself. The
speaker is struggling with this choice, stuck between a rock and a hard
place, or in this case; between the woods and the frozen pond.
Naturally, this all takes place on the darkest day of the year; the
winter solstice, december 21st, the darkest day in his life, his
sadness, his isolation. and his depression are the greatest. So, in
the third stanza, we see the conflict of should I do it or not. The
horse, his friend, his reason, the connection back to civilization and
life, is signaling to the speaker as if saying, "hey, let's get the
hell out of here. This isn't what you want to do, is it? This is a
mistake. Let's go." Meanwhile, the speaker is hearing this, but is
also seeing how nice the wind is and how it could blow away all his
worries and woes. The downy flakes would cover it all up and he'd
never have to worry about it again. However, in the end, the speaker
realizes that although death, the dark and deep woods covered in snow,
would be an answer to his problems; it's not his answer. He has
promises to keep. He does actually have a connection to the life he
wants to ax and therefore decides to keep journeying on. He has many
things still to do. He has many miles to go before he sleeps.

Jason Pope said...

Robert Frost's poem is actually about a gentleman contemplating
suicide. The first image of the blanket of snow, the death shroud,
covering everything invokes the reader into participating in the
speaker's unnoticed and unseen death. Why would you want someone there
to stop you if you really were going to do that? The horse notices
something's wrong and that it's only the speaker and himself. The
speaker is struggling with this choice, stuck between a rock and a hard
place, or in this case; between the woods and the frozen pond.
Naturally, this all takes place on the darkest day of the year; the
winter solstice, december 21st, the darkest day in his life, his
sadness, his isolation. and his depression are the greatest. So, in
the third stanza, we see the conflict of should I do it or not. The
horse, his friend, his reason, the connection back to civilization and
life, is signaling to the speaker as if saying, "hey, let's get the
hell out of here. This isn't what you want to do, is it? This is a
mistake. Let's go." Meanwhile, the speaker is hearing this, but is
also seeing how nice the wind is and how it could blow away all his
worries and woes. The downy flakes would cover it all up and he'd
never have to worry about it again. However, in the end, the speaker
realizes that although death, the dark and deep woods covered in snow,
would be an answer to his problems; it's not his answer. He has
promises to keep. He does actually have a connection to the life he
wants to ax and therefore decides to keep journeying on. He has many
things still to do. He has many miles to go before he sleeps.

If you were still looking for a critical analysis.

cheers.

zhao lin said...

It is really a very good poem. It was in the last summer school break that i got to know it. A good friend on line said it was the only poem he could remember as a result of his college education and he recited it for me word by word. I was a little bit touched at that moment.
And right now i am in my universuty as a freshman. i am not quite accustomed to the life here in this atrange city. Though almost half a year has already passed, i still think about the past good days a lot. And yesterday that friend called me to say he was thinking of me and could not help being lonely sometimes cuz he was always travelling on his own. He has been to many beautiful cities but had no one to share it with. I thought of that poem right after his call. So i recited it right away.
HE WILL NOT SEE ME STOPPING HERE/ TO WATCH HIS WOODS FILL UP WITH SNOW.
Anyway, i still believe that since life seems to be too short for us to enjoy its happiness, why not cheer up to face all the difficulties lying ahead? Since we cannot change them, why not accept them willingly? It will be good for us to forget all the pains and sorrow and to live as our own wishes, to get our own happiness. As soon as you have made clear what you want in this short life, you can set out for the future to come, no matter how dark or snowy the night may be.

Michael Pederson said...

It seems Elena gets it. For the rest, it seems we are too profound
sometimes for our own good.

Autumn Metzger said...

An english teacher of mine once had a girl in her class. This girl's relative once had Frost himself visit their school for an assembly. Someone asked him about this poem, and he said that it was about one night when his wife asked him to go get groceries and nothing more. He ended up stopping on the way home to watch the snow falling, but he knew his wife would get angry if he was much later since he had miles to go before he reached home.

Steve said...

Are you "Thee" Carolee Marano formerly of Staten Island? If so, Happy New Year!

reblind said...

> From: "Kydd, Neal" <NKydd@>
>
> Mr Frost, writing on snow... visits the mood of silent cold and slewed time
> rather acutely.
> For here the seasons of life move as winter shadows us - times wake leaves
> in its path the more of nothingness... for snow, as life, melts away. And
> only few of us realise that someone is watching....

"For here the seasons of life move as winter shadows us - times wake
leaves in its path the more of nothingness... for snow, as life, melts
away. And only few of us realize that someone is watching..."

You posted that onto a page with "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening" by
Robert Frost. I think that that is one of the best things I've ever read.
Did you write that? Or was it something else of Frost's that I simply don't
know about?

Steve

Ltnftw03 said...

Does anyone know what the significance of winter in this poem is?

KidzCowGrl said...

thanks for that analysis. it seems right on!
-just jenn

Julmarria said...

I do not believe that robert frost was at all thinking of committing suicide. I believe that life had taken its toll on him just as it does us all after a lifetime of living. If you ever read 'A Swinger of Birches,' then you will realize that he was only weary of decisions 'so was I once a swinger of birches . And I so I dream of going back to be.It's when I'm weary of considerations.' He wanted to return to the carelessness that defines childhood, not die- 'may no fate willfully misunderstand me and half grant my wish and snatch me away not to return.' You just have to read the poem because 'one could do worse than to be a swinger of birches.'

- Julmarria (17)

Andy del Castillo said...

Clearly he's trespassing. Get your stupid horse and your sorry ass off the village guy's property and cheer up will ya? Ahh, who cares anyway...

Andrés del Castillo
Director, Business Development
GAPC

14 Colonnade Rd. Suite 180
Ottawa, Ontario
K2E 7Mx 241
www.gapc.com

Amy Scott said...

I bought this poem in a children's book picture format (illustrated by Susan Jeffers) for my daughter when she was born since we had the first big snowfall of the year that night. We read it almost every -- including tonight. I was very taken back when I saw on a list of love poems that it was about "suicide". I never once thought of it meaning that. I did some quick searching and found your site which presented both views. I was glad to read many of your comments that it is not about suicide. There are lines in it that I never thought much about...and I think I will keep it that way. As for the rest of it -- what is more wonderful then snowshoeing in the mountains as the snow is falling and when there is no one else around? I am anxious to share this with my daughter and I am glad that for now I have Frost to help us share the experience! To me it is the most peaceful moment on earth!

alecia said...

I believe the "he" in this poem is the owner of the woods... "who's woods these are I think I know"... who won't see him trespassing because he lives in the village.
I THINK. Maybe it has some God- connection... I don't know what I'm talking about.

<33

Preston Beach said...

Hi, my name is Preston and I am a poet. I, like the famed teacher in
"Dead Poet Society," hate the over-analysis of poetry, though I love
discussion of it. All the Pritchards of the world to the trash can, I
say!

I love Frost's poems because they are him, and they are New England.
There is something that stands aloof yet humble in Frost's writing, as
if to say "Interpret as you wish; but this is my experience: you are a
visitor in the library of my thoughts."

I don't like it when people "rewrite" what I have penned (read Ray
Bradbury's "afterward and coda" from Fahrenheit 451). Be moved, be
inspired, be appalled, but be silent. Don't speak for the writing of
others...let it speak to you. Otherwise, what's the point? Dissecting
living things kills them.

stewart said...

i came upon this site by chance, and after reading the listeners, which has
to be one of my favourites, i read for the first time "stopping by the
woods",as it had been mentioned by others in thier comments. Firstly i would
like to say thank to you for introducing me to this lovely poem, but
secondly i would like to agree with one comment that said we over analyse
poems. I would much rather think of frost writing this after he had shopped
for his wife, and being so taken by the beautiful sight of the woods covered
in snow, than seeing a man contemplating suicide. can we not see these poems
for the beauty the words give us and not keep looking for hidden messages?
when i was a child the listeners were a "host of phantoms" haunting a now
empty house, and the traveller had visited the house when he was in the area
after promising to do so maybe years before. it was frightening and creepy
which made it great to a child being introduded to poetry by my mother.
Can't we just leave it there, instead of trying to see something deep and
meaningful?
thank you for the site i will now use it often.

Kannappan said...

This is a beautiful poem that appeared in my tenth Standard
matriculation English here in India. To this day I remember that
lovely Woods are lovely, dark and deep line.

Peter Boliszczuk said...

Hi there
An interesting site. I have loved this poem since I first read it. I am in my mid fifties and have worked hard all of my life. I feel I am the man in the poem. I lead a life I do not particularly care for. Middle class north American. I am not so much thinking of ending it all but would just like to stop and wander in the woods for a while. BUT, I have miles to go and promises to keep
Peter

John Brooks CMC said...

Re: "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening" - This is one of the most
beautiful and touching poems in the English language. It is a delight
to read so many different reactions to it. Great poetry has no
objective existence in and of itself - it's greatness lies in it's being
a mirror of the Universal in the human soul, and thus we may each find
ourselves in it. I find also interesting the report that Frost told a
school class that it was simply about getting groceries. Elsewhere, he
said the poem "contains everything I know about life." I agree that his
poems may be read on many levels. For those who may wish to go beyond
the surface levels of Frost (New England nature scenes, politics, etc.)
I suggest you look for the thread that runs through his poems
"Reluctance", "The Tuft of Flowers", "Birches", "Happiness Makes Up in
Height for What It Lacks in Depth", "Acquainted with the Night",
"Bereft", "The Master Speed", "All Revelation", "One More Brevity", and
"Stopping By Woods". And there are other gems. As revealed in his
poetry, I find Frost a man of deep mystical experience and metaphorical
largess, without alignment to any particular theology. - John Brooks

Iain Marin said...

I think that it is also important to emphasise the two last lines in the third verse. "easy wind" and, more crucially, "DOWNY flake" suggest the sleepy atmosphere that occurs in this part of the poem. The character wants to sleep - or is it more?
A doctor could give you a detailed interpretation of this poem - during the initiall stages of hypothermia we may feel happy, outgoing, or alternatively sleepy, sad. It is possible that the charcter is feeling the effects of the cold. This leaves us with two possibilities - 1) that he is only sleepy (and suicidal) due to the cold, or 2) that he has a desire to commit suicide regardless of the cold. Indeed, this last idea seems more acceptable, since the poem goes on to say "but I have promises to keep." This shows us that he has been considering either sleep or death.
The last two lines also mirror this - the first one "and miles to go before i sleep" has the meaning that he has a great distance to travel before he gets home. The second bit, the repetition, has the meaning that he does not want to stop his life for a good long while.
So, to people that are dissapointed by the revelation of the possible connotations os suicide, i actually find this poem quite uplifting - he has shrugged off suicide and is going to continue life.

Tmathew541 said...

Well, I am supposed to write an essay on this poem and when I read all the
comments on this website I got confused. Some people said it was about the man
about to commit suicide. Some people take it as a very peaceful area where this
man is just there. Me? I have a feeling that this man is wondering about his
journey through life. He might be wondering what might happen after 6 or 10
years from now. I know you can interpret a poem into many meanings, but I have
to connect it to a book called the Outsiders. Please help if you can, thanks.
~Cheerfulhelper909

Peasedsc said...

I have never read this poem, but I am on this web site looking for the
author, which is obviously Rboert Frost. My teacher Mrs. L. Elliott AMS gives me and
my class door trivia, which is a trivia question each week and the question,
of course, hangs on the door. This week it was about you. Which poet wrote
"Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening"? And I found my answer! Thanks!!!!!

Don Prisby said...

Thank you all for your insightful commentaries. I believe this poem is
about the universal human struggle between the desire to slow down and
notice the beauty in a moment - and the inclination, obligation and
natural tendency to be about our tasks. Frost represents this battle
metaphorically in the traveler and his horse. The traveler himself is
surprised, if not challenged at the call to slow down and observe the
beauty around him. The horse is trained to keep moving and has an
innate tendency to trod forward. In the end, the traveler sadly
realizes that as much as he would like to, ("The woods are lovely dark
and deep") he cannot slow down. He must move forward ("but I have
promises to keep. And miles to go..).

I have had the good fortune of composing music for this poem which
further illustrates the struggle described herein.

Donald E. Prisby, Jr.

Incentric Marketingphonemobilefacsimile

Andrew Gratton said...

thank you for your opinion on the poem...i actually used it on critical analysis paper i had to do for one of my college classes! thanks again

HottChickSammy2 said...

hey i realy like that poem stopping by woods on a snowy evening
if u could send me some more of his poems .
thanks samantha

leftwithoutlight said...

In Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, Frost again uses his ingenious symbolism. Here, the woods represent his life line. He stops in the middle of the woods. He stops to think about his life and everything that's been going on. His horse thinks it odd to stop with no farmhouse near because the horse knows that if they don't find shelter, they will eventually die from the cold. The darkest evening, of course, representing a day of death.
The horse shakes his harness bells to alert that it is indeed cold outside, and if they stay out much longer, they will die. He ignores the horse.
I believe this part of the poem is symbolic of him contemplating suicide. He's thinking about going to the frozen lake. The last stanza is crucial in this poem. In it, Frost states that life is long and full of beauty, and even though he'd like to stay and die, we all have things in life that must be done. He says it's not his time yet. He has unfinished business to do in this life, and he can't give up on it until he's finished. He repeats the last line to stress how important it is.

-Matt Maxwell

BillEhlers said...

Perhaps the most beautiful line of the poem is "These woods are lovely, dark
and deep," I love this soft and gentle poem. I am a doctor and imagine the
person watching the woods fill up with snow is a doctor returning from
visiting a patient, beckoned by the peace and diversion of the woods, but
knowing he has obligations.

Jeff Cooper said...

he's thinking about suicide

Jerry Smith said...

Bill,

I'm a career English teacher and I, too, have always imagined the
speaker to be a doctor in a rural area--going here to deliver Mrs.
Abbot's baby, there to set Billy Jacob's arm, there to
check on Mary's elevated temperature and stop her, hopefully, short of
pneumonia. A doctor
would have the education and sensibiility to appreciate the beauty and
tranquility of the scene, but feel the obligation to fulfill his
"promises" to his patients and travel the many miles before arriving at
home late and exhausted. I'm certain that a lot of rural GP's from the
past could certainly relate to the dichotomy in this poem.

Jerry Smith
The Shelton School
Dallas, Texas

kdcatsbearchaser said...

I HAVE BEEN TIRED AND IN PAIN BEFORE; AS HAVE MANY. I HAVE LEARNED TO STOP AND "suck it up"; as did the rider on a dark snowy night. he longed for rest and peace of mind-but life happens while having a pity party. The world has more than enough cynics. Quit berating Frost's rhyming, etc., and appreciate one of the most beautiful lines ever written. It would be a great line to say aloud every morning for inspriation to keep going. Many miles to go----the miles can add up to a great distance with this attitude. I hope all of you can keep going-my best thoughts for you.

Tamara Francis said...

if you think about this poem in another way it can be quite rude... think of the woods as being a woman..."whose woods are these i think i no" "he will no see me stopping here to see his woods fill up with SNOW" sorry i dont mean to be crass but someone pointed tha out to me and i thought id share...apply it through out the whole poem and it will become clear

Colin Day said...

Perhaps the most beautiful line of the poem is "These woods are lovely,
dark and deep," I love this soft and gentle poem. I am a doctor and
imagine the person watching the woods fill up with snow is a doctor
returning from visiting a patient, beckoned by the peace and diversion
of the woods, but knowing he has obligations.

Funny you should say that, but I always imagined a Doctor on his way to
visit a patient. Perhaps to deliver a baby...

My favourite poem.

Greetings from (Old) England

Colin Day

Annaviacar said...

Your explanation of Frost's poem was great, "Stoping by Woods on a Snowy
Evening." Makes sense to me. He just stopped by on his way to the store. He
knew who the woods belonged to. A friend of mine thought that meant just the
outside world, the owner of the woods. I think that's probably true.

A beautiful poem.

Thanks.

oanh pham said...

In my opinion, Frost referred to the call of nature: all are born to die eventually. The horse represents survival instinct to always win or should win over the death instinct. The struggle is always there and beautifully embodied and illustrated.

OPham.

Mark Currie said...

Not about suicide. Man is doctor or minister. He cares for others and
is worn out. But he will continue to live for others and meet his
obligations, not succumbing to the temptations of rest, knowing his
eternal rests waits further down the road.

Lewis Wedlake said...

its gay

Dr. Joan Breuer-McHam said...

"The woods are lovely,dark, and deep.
And I have promises to keep.
And I have promises to keep."

These words are so applicable to starting my new life, I quoted them in the
Dedication page of my Dissertation.

Joan Breuer, Ph.D.

Erick Kelemen said...

Trying on Pants on a Snowy Evening

Whose pants these are, I think I know,
His house is in the village, though.
He will not see me stopping here
To try his pants on in the snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near,
Between the woods and frozen lake,
The coldest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of wool against my trouser snake.

The pants fit lovely through my seat,
But do not reach quite to my feet,
And I don't have a sales receipt,
And I don't have a sales receipt.

omacbeth said...

It's amazing how all of these people can be exactly right in their thoughts.

cboerner said...

I find this elegant use of vowels & consonants delicious, as my mouth waters while my visual takes over. My mind's eye that is, & I see his comfort in knowing he will die, just as all things do. Yet, he has made commitments, so he must not tarry, no he must not tarry. Poor neighbor, how could one be so blind as to not yearn to look upon that field, the lake, the dark of the eve with downy flake? Ahhh, this must be what heaven will be like.....Thank you for allowing me to share... Cathy

Imran Jiva said...

i am reading this poem to my child

he is asking lots of questions,
ive got a beautifly illustarted version

can some one tell on a basic level, what this poem is about?
who is the person travelling?
where is he going ?
who does he visit ?
what ddoes he give them?

these are some of the questions being asked my child, for whichi cant give musch answers

amber love said...

i love this peom we had to memorize it in sixth grade and i loved it now it also
made me wright poems to my freinds tell me there good but im not sure i guess i have to wait untill im older

Kevin Grimes said...

My favorite interpretation is that the guy is Santa Claus and his
"little horse" is a reindeer and it is otherwise a very busy evening for
the speaker.

Jan Byron Wooten said...

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. -Sigmund Freud
Hmmm ... no one has said anything about how lyrical this poem is. Just
listen and sit like the Buddha. Nothing else is needed.
:-) Jahn

Lisa said...

This is one of the best poems i have ever read. i believe that it is means
that poeple should
try to stop every once in awhile to watch life not just let it go by without
knowing it.
Kimberly Simmons age 16

robert wyss said...

Has anyone ever considered a parallel between Frost's reflective moment in the woods on a snowy evening and Dante's famous "nel mezzo del camin..." (In the middle of life's journey, I found myself in a dark wood, having lost my way...)? I would not suggest that Frost made a conscious attempt to evoke Dante in his poem, but merely the possibility that at a certain time in his life Frost similarly felt compelled to deeply reconsider the meaning and purpose of his life. Perhaps finding oneself in the deep and dark woods activates an archetype, best expressed by poets, to which all of us can relate as we near our life's halfway mark.

liz said...

I feel the poem is something to do with the struggle of writing itself; the pause before the process begins; the frozen lake of the empty white page, the half familiar snatches of words and lines from other poets that crowd the mind.

Karen Kiefel said...

This poem is certainly one of my favorites. I almost always recite it when I ride my horse out in the snow. Isolated in the woods, with only a horse for company... there really is a wish to linger and this poem touches on that feeling so well. Though I heard once that the promise R. Frost had to keep was simply to return from town with some butter for dinner... he he he.

Peter Connors said...

My English professor gave me some insight into this poem that I
don't see on many web analysis' of the work. At a reading of the poem
at UNH, Mr. Frost took an inquisitive student aside after the
presentation and told him what the poem was actually about. He said
that the poem was about his returning from market to his farm in NH, on
the winter solstice, "the darkest evening of the year." He had failed
to acquire any Christmas gifts for his family, as his farm goods had
sold for a lower price than expected. Coming between "woods and frozen
lake" he contemplated suicide, either by sinking himself in the lake or
running into the woods. Thankfully and quite amazingly, the horse
inquisitively "gave its harness bells a shake to see if there was some
mistake," and carried on with their journey back to the farm, saving Mr.
Frost's life from his own hands. If you wish I'm sure I can find the
citation of this work, as my Professor has studied Mr. Frost
extensively tthroughout his career and most assuredly has the citation.

Best Regards

Steve said...

The horse is life itself. The meaning is obvious. Although tragedy befalls us on occasion, we must continue on. The "pause" is the contemplation of suicide.

- Steve
Ontario Canada

Akshat Sharma said...

Frost's piece is haunting much like an 'Evanescence' song, the poem opens up like a painful flower. I adore it.... I, who has never seen a winter.

'I'll miss the winter,
A world of fragile things,
Look for me in the white forest
hiding in a hollow tree
<you'll find me there>'
-Evanescence.

HJCOZZ said...

Also, on of my favorites. Only one person seemed to connect Robert Frost's
thoughts to a physician in his horse and carriage going to make a house call
and pausing by a beautiful scene, but still having promises (to see his
patient), and miles to go before he sleeps. This is beautiful, not suicidal.


()

John Przybyla said...

i think (and this is just my interpritation) that this poem is about a man who had an old friend that owned woods. this friend died, but the man still remembers him and his woods. the woods in this poem are just a state of mind and the man is looking back on his memories of the woods-he is not really in woods. The "house" in the village is the friend's grave. The friend will not see him "stopping here" because he is dead. the man's horse is his conscience telling him that he should not be just looking back on his memories and that he has better things to do. The "darkest evening of the year" is not really the winter solstace. it is an expression. it means the saddest evening of the year because it is the day his old friend died. The "promises to keep" are promises that the man made to himself and his friend that he would do certain things before he died and the "miles to go before i sleep" are the things that he has to do before he dies...the sleep is death.

just to let you know, i am only 13 years old so my interpritation (and my spelling) are not the best...but I have an amazing ELA teacher who makes us look deeper in meaning with poems. thank you for posting this poem...i have to memorize it for ELA and i was looking for it. I also enjoyed reading other people's interpritations of this poem so I could share them with my class.

~Stephanie~

Angel said...

I love the way his poems are short but say something important like in A Minor Bird he used that you can't make a bird be quiet. i just love all his poems i have a big book of all his poems. they are awesome.

susan gay said...

Hi,
Just wanted to say I have been a follower of Robert Frost since high school. Of all the works he has done this is my favorite. Thanks for acknowledging this great poet.

His poetry as do all his pieces are remarkable, in the sense each person depending on their mood sees something different. This is why he is a unique and gifted poet.

I see two things. Love of nature, the need to escape the world of man. This may not be a man, but rather a woman or young person. Trapped by the beauty and solitude the person is drawn into the very heart of God's gift to man. The darkness and beauty of the wood hold the person captive. Each person feels what the person in the poem does. We are all torn between enjoyment and obligation. We want so desperately to stay where it is pleasant, but ultimately realize we have responsibilities. When it snows and I drive past a wood especially at night, I have been known to stop and sing the last verse of this timeless verse.

I also see a person who is tired of the world of man and has come to leave the world behind. The darkness and the beauty of the wood, the snow (which could mean purity at the end of a life journey), the horse sensing something is not right, the comment they will not see me stopping here, all signify what someone contemplating suicide might perceive. I am glad at the end of the verse the person realizes there are people who care about them. You also see the person knowing their work is not done and they must follow through on the original plan.

Whatever Mr. Frost might have meant by his poem does not matter. It is left to each of us the readers of his work to enjoy it in our own personal way.

Thanks for posting it.
Susan

Allan Gardner said...

Like many I have often wondered of the meaning to Frost Poem.

As a young man I thought it was Father Christmas stopping to admire the woods, but with many presents and miles to go, he could not sleep.

As a slightly more mature young man I thought that the house might refer to God's house, God's woods. The traveller has much to do before his life's work and many miles to go before he may sleep.

Having read others thoughts I think I'll stick with my boyhood dreams.

Allan

samford said...

Every now and then in life, we need to call "time out,." stop and recharge
our spiritual batteries. It is a very personal experience that you don't
want to
discuss with or explain to others. Perhaps the recharge comes by stopping
and watching a field fill up with snow, or perhaps it watching the joy of
two lovers in springtime, laughing and talking on a city street. Enjoy it,
imbibe it,...but after all, it's only a refueling stop, don't stay there
because life goes on.

r_sanhaji said...

hallo
My name is hasnaa andi would like to add something that catched my intention, this poem is one of the great pome i have ever read it symolises human duties and responsiilities the Man must faced .The speaker was in difficult situation fighthing to survive without thinking of a moment of pleasure life made him acting like a fool ,so once he was passing something woke his desire a beatiful scene woods fill up with snow the speaker admires the beauty of the lovely,dark and deep woods however,life and social duties could not let him doing his admiration at ease no he was hurried because duty or promisses calls him

PeachyKeen26ihp said...

I like to think that this poem is about just taking some time out of your
busy life to enjoy something simple.

Emily

cassie fraser said...

Ive always adored this poem; Not for just it's simplicity and ethical
rhyming but, of course, the magic. I love the captured scene, I can see
it clearly in my head. Ive loved this since I was a small child. Thanks
you.

Sugarcrazy15 said...

My 7th grade class has to memorize this poem then recite it in front of the
class.

Sugarcrazy15 said...

(~Nicole Allen~)

Susan Styles said...

over fifty years ago i studied english.this poem i remember vey well,our assingmemt was to memorize (i can still recite it today) and give a therory.this was simply a doctor doing house calls which believe it on not doctors did at one time.after all these years i was wondering who wrote it i tried kipling first then to this site.thank you

JBrown said...

Does it matter what a poem means if one can enjoy it. This poem can be
light or dark
But does it matter. Of course not. This poem is written to be enjoyed not
over analyzed to death.

Becca307 said...

I saw a print of this Robert Frost poem at
an art show last weekend. I was very drawn
to it, and thought it was a perfect wedding gift
for my parents 44th year together.
My parents live out in the country, in michigan--and
my mother has been very ill. Through out 44 years,
and 5 kids, 11 grandkids....my parents have been so strong.
They work hard, and keep true to all their life
promises, they never seem to "sleep".
I truly read into many sides of the poem.

I'm excited to give them this gift.

Gayatri WattalUgra said...

I never thought I'fd find somany analyses on the poem.I just want to add that the last four lines became known to the whole of India because Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru had hand written and placed them on his desk.

FISH7SOCCER said...

The poem written by Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, makes
me think about Santa Clause. Although he’s fake, the words they write in this
poem made Santa pop into my head. The “darkest evening of the year”, also I
believe would be the quietest and that’s when all the children go to bed early
to sleep the night away till Christmas day. “Between the woods and frozen lake
” is like Colorado which is snowy to Virginia that is not, because Santa
makes it all over the world, from snow to shine. “He gives the harness bells a
shake” is like the reindeers taking off to another house. “He will not see me
stopping here” because the children will be in bed. “The woods are lovely, dark
and deep” because no ones out and everyone’s in bed getting ready for the
big day, so Santa can come down the chimney. “To ask if there is some mistake”
of a toy or a wrong direction. “But I have promises to keep” Santa makes
promises to all the good children with the toys they’ve earned through out the
years. “And miles to go before I sleep.” He has to make his slay, himself, and
his reindeers all around the world, from California to Asia, before he can go
to his snowy house in the North Pole and sleep.

Worwood Carol said...

I think this is the most beautiful poem I have read. You don't have to
be an intellectual genius for it to speak to you. People shouldn't try
and assert what Robert Frost was saying in it. Part of the beauty and
craft of the writing is the very fact that the reader can use it as a
reflection of his own life. So OK, Frost may have actually stopped by
woods such as these on his way home from running an errand but, at the
same time the very sight could have taken him off onto another train of
thought. When I first read it, I took the first three verses at face
value but then you reach the last verse and suddenly extra dimensions
are added. When my little boy, Jai, died I would have loved to have
gone into those woods, but I had promises to keep: a two year old little
girl who still needed her mummy.

Fehratfaris said...

I am a seventh grader, and my tutor showed me this poem. I think this is one
of Robert Frost's better poems because it gives a feeling about nature. It
made me think of when i was in my country, yugoslavia, in the woods when it
snowed and it made me want to go back home.

mswuff said...

Today over lunch with my partner, the subject of Robert Frost's poem came
up, and suddenly, for the first time, it hit me like a brick: Good
heavens, he's talking about death! As soon as I got home, I googled it
and found your site. Thanks for printing the entire poem.
- Trina

Derby Lewis said...

I was first introduced to this poem in a novel of Jilly Cooper's called Polo. If you apply the poem in that context, to me the meaning or context becomes clear. It is a story of the trials of the human experience and the courage it takes to face and overcome them. The explananation that he was just buying groceries is a let down and trivialises the entire meaning.Thanks

Tony and Kathy Jaffary said...

Well, just to put it out there to let you know.

Robert Frost, is thinking about killing himself in this poem.

When he wrote the poem, he was going through manic depression.

The first 2 stanzas are saying that he is alone and no one is around.
Perfect place and time to do the deed.

His horse doesn't give his harness bells a shake, he is just shaking the
snow of his back. And Roberts sees that as a message. To not commit suicide.

But then he talks himself out of it, by remembering that he has a long life
ahead of him with "promises to keep" and "miles to go before I sleep"

Sleep = Death

It is a lovely poem

Steve Shannon said...

It's about Santa Claus

Steve Shannon
Morning Co-host/Public Service Director
CJWW Radio
Saskatoon, Sk
S7K 5S5
ph:fax

Roy J Palma said...

This is such a wonderful poem to me, I had to memorize it and recite the poem in front of my 1st grade class in 1964, a very good memory.

~:o)
~:o) ~¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤~

Scott Susan said...

I'm with you, Elena!

I've always thought it was about Santa. Glad to know that there is
someone else out there (maybe really "out there") like me.

Ah, to see life through rose colored glasses!

Michael Smith said...

how so have you come to learn only the last verse?

Frolence Rutechura said...

I really like this poem by Frost, especially when he compares our general care of life without nature. The last two repeared verses emphasizes Frost's thematic domain about nature.

Frolence Rutechura,
Carleton University,
1125 Colonel By Drive,
221A Glengarry House,
Mailbox 2503,
Ottawa,Ontario,
Canada.
Tel:/5020

alternative emails: or


keep your fears to yourself but share your courage with others

Caren & Jeff Gallagher said...

I LOVE THIS POEM!!!!!!

My fifth grade teacher loved Robbie Frost!!! She had us memorize this poem
and now I have a research project on poetry. And I picked Robert Frost for
my poet. It's so much fun learning about him after fifth grade. He's really
interesting.

By the
way.........................................................................
............................................................................
............................................................................
............................................................................
..............................................................
I LOVE THIS
POEM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Lou Johnston said...

Frost was asked what he was thinking about when he wrote the poem. He replied: "i was just going for groceries".

Those who think he was contemplating suicide are really stretching it.

Gwen

Charles said...

Right on

Charles P. Fairchild of nearly 57 years experience.

LaDora Flood said...

Hi,

I feel I have been there and experienced the feelings. Many times I have ridden my horse on the deserted back country roads in the snow belt of PA. I have stopped her on the snow covered roads with the woods by our sides, listened to the quiet, and watched the flakes slowly fall. Often she would nod her head or raise a hoof and hold it up, as it to say, "Why are we stopping here?" The smell of freshness, the feelings of cold fingers, toes, and nose...we are alone but we are not alone. Nature can be so perfect. Sometimes we just have to stop and take it into ourselves. The problems of life can never compete and disappear, if only for a while. Frost writes,"The woods are lovely, dark and deep...". I think he might have felt, like me, that you just want to stay in this wonderland for a while longer but the cold, the horse and other demands on your life call you away.

I believe the person in the poem could be a country doctor traveling between patients or some other person traveling between farms. I do not see it as a person thinking about suicide at all.

Peter, I am the same age as you are. If you don't like your life, you can at least change your inner life, your thoughts. They are yours. Sneak away when you can to sit under a brillant colored fall tree, spend time noticing the sky, find some pond or lake and watch the water shimmer. We are only here for such a short time. LaDora

The Diplomat said...

It was sometime between 1959 and 1962- I was fortunate to be in the front row for an hour of Robert Frost reading Robert Frost.

As a purely technical person, I never could read beneath the surface of any literature and disliked poetry. All save Robert Frost. And this poem my favorite. His own comments on his work have long escaped me except for his closing remark. "Good fences make good neighbors- or do they?" He left us with that.

I will never forget that hour.

connie christopher said...

Thanks for your excellent analysis of the Frost poem. God only knows when you posted that but I just read it and appreciated it.

Shannon Sammons said...

The great thing about this poem is that it is simplistic yet beautiful. It reminds you as a younger person you would have explored the lovely woods but as a grownup with responsibilities how sad it is that you cannot.

Linda.Beebe said...

I do love this poem. While I conceed the poem may have a darker edge
could it be that the he's telling us to not be wrapped up in our tasks. He
could be telling us to stop and notice the joys and beauty around us at
all times.

Linda Beebe-Boring
UWE & WVE Aspire

Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas.
Marie Curie (1867 - 1958)

¸Öïï ³¯ said...

hello, i am Cindy
i saw you in the your message of the Robert Frost ''stopping by woods on a snowy evening. i am touch by your words. So, don't give up everything, finally you will succeed. Haha, you say you are the journalist, woo, amazing job. i am the university studednt from the Taiwan. i hope to make friends with you.
by by

____________________________________________________________________________________¡A
§K¶O¤U¸ü°g§Aµ§¡A¤¤­^½Ķ»´ÃP¬d

Keith Sisk said...

R. Keith Sisk

E-Commerce

Jarden Applied Materialsx1589

RLSALES said...

I had to memorize this poem back in the 8th grade. Now it is my sons time
and we now both enjoy this poem!
La'Nae M. Garner

jesusarvizu said...

lame ass poem

Larry Ellison said...

I find it interesting that the end of this beautiful poem appears in two movies (that I am aware of):
(1) Telefon, a suspense movie about a cold war plot by Russia to trigger terrorist attacks on the United States via imbedded operatives. These unsuspecting citizens are commanded to carry out their assignments when they receive a telephone call with the last four lines of this poem, which comprise a post-hypnotic command to initiate a pre-planned attack.
(2) Grindhouse: Death Proof, a rather bloody movie about a stunt man who hunts down and kills young women with his car. The last four lines of the poem are a secret code that, when recited by a stranger in a bar, require a young woman to perform a lap-dance.
Are there more examples of the use of this poem in movies?

Anonymous said...

can't believe it has been almost 2 years since anyone has posted a comment here. The poem, in itself is probably very much as a personal reflection on his life at that one moment in time on a solstice evening, errand, and what is it worth to keep going on...yet wishing to take a whiff (maybe last) of the flowers. All that as it may, the beauty of the Poem is not only in the literal "translation" of Frost's state at that moment, but the multi-level applications it has to so much of mankind's common traits. Yes we do forget to smell the flowers along the way, and we see in the contrasts of simple beauty the harsh reality of the everyday world bearing down; we can get caught up in the commercialism of "taught" life, and we can also debate how being responsibile to customs, mores, or whatever acts as societal pressures, has resulted in the possible technological duress that currently airs as global warming threat, or the like. ( Earth versus Pandora, for current movie goers) Yet I have always likened this poem to a higher level of responsibility...so I can see how many here think it is a 'doctor' out on a snowy evening who appreciates the beauty, but has his calling, so needs to fulfill before he can rest. ( Not death per se, but being able to stop and appreciate, down the road). Most of the attributes, I am familiar with, in novels borrowing from this poem concern a soldier off to battle. Who takes a last brief look at himself or life or a beautiful thing or moment, before he has to do duty to his country, or family, or whatever he holds as sacrosanct, that is bigger than individual life and getting one's piece of the pie. The errand before sleep is to preserve that sound sleep, or "peace for all," and that is nobel responsibility, not just an "errand". Maybe a bit too altruistic interpretation of Frost's poem, but a lot "healthier" if you ask me than just placing it as death thoughts on the long path of life.

Abhinav said...

i think it can be used for hypnosis

Anonymous said...

This poem is about contemplating suicide

Dante said...

Has anyone heard the symphonix song called miles to go? Check it out...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5fH73VrpN4

I view it as a re-inmagining of the poem.

Anonymous said...

OMG thanks soo much jason pope, you took my interpretation right out my moth. It made me understand the genius of robert frost.

Anonymous said...

My ex-boyfriend brought this poem to my knowledge many years ago alas he has since died so every-time I hear this or read this I think of him and how much he loved this small poem and how it invoked such fond memories of his childhood....I thank him for this wonderful gift for I now often sit and remember fonder times ....so thank you P.J and thank you Robert Frost.

Anonymous said...

Correctly or not, this is my 'have to get this finished' poem. Whenever I have too much on my plate and rest is far away, I mutter the last stanza beneath my breath.

SethAMyers said...

At this point, he is not stopping to ponder beauty. At this point in his life, he owes everyone he knows a lot of money, and his son just got very sick, he went to his rich father in laws house to ask for money to pay the doctor, since he already owes the doctor too much money, his father in law tells him to get a job.. He feels like a complete failure and on his way home from his father in law's house, he stops at the woods and grabs his shotgun, he wants to go out and commit suicide.. this is in no way a happy poem.

Tekli Bereket (TK) said...

I heard the poem just on tuesday may 4 2010. I am a college student in Erirea and just when we learning english Our teacher told us about the very interesting poem of Robert Frost-STOPPING BY WOODS-it is really good poem that draws me to the imaginary world of beauty with white snow falling and the Green long jungle aln also the horse.

Simon Ghirmai said...

a really interesting poem ever heard thanks to Mrs. ,my teacher who let me know it

777att said...

Hi, enjoyed your page very much came across it rather strangely.... enjoyed cheers

কাদা মাটি জল said...

This is the poem that made me to enter the world of English poems

sandeep bankhwal said...

The depiction of nature in this poem is marvellous, and the use of words describing sentiments of the poet is incredible. Robert Frost was a born poet, and poets of his stature are born once in a century.Why we can not meet such type of people today? Now, the greedy people are thinking of extracting money from the nature too. God, pardon them.

Anonymous said...

The last passage (the woods etc) of the poem was added as a signature to the emails of friend who recently took his own life. I never made the connection until after the fact.

Auntnanny said...

I can't believe some of the analyses of this simple and beautiful poem. I hate the dark insinuations placed on it. It means what it says... nothing dark, no death wish. It is a man traveling on a horse... simple. It is snowing... simple. The snow in the woods is too beautiful to ignore... simple. He stops to enjoy the beauty... who wouldn't? The horse is curious... the man stays on, no water to drink, nothing to eat... simple horse reaction... interpreted for the poem as "curiosity" .. sweet and simple. The man has places to go, people to see, schedules to keep. He wants to enjoy the beautiful scenery longer.. but must leave... there isn't time to dilly dally, rest, waste time, relax, etc. Simple. Beautiful simplicity. Just another version of "Work hard, but don't forget to smell the roses." Says I

meera said...

super dooopper poem!!!!!!!

ethelbert somera said...

its the best!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Every now and then in life, we need to call "time out,." stop and recharge
our spiritual batteries. It is a very personal experience that you don't
want to
discuss with or explain to others. Perhaps the recharge comes by stopping
and watching a field fill up with snow, or perhaps it watching the joy of
two lovers in springtime, laughing and talking on a city street. Enjoy it,
imbibe it,...but after all, it's only a refueling stop, don't stay there
because life goes on.

ethelbert somera from katiku president quirino sultan kudarat said...

for those people who have just come to read the poem. i would suggest that dont make it a habit make it a desease..................life wont stop unless you make it stop, it only means that we have almost all the right to what are we going to do with oue selves. what matters most is the way we make and mange our lives..=) to you whome i know has a great problem let the roses on the road side heal it no thing worth controling our lives its he who does. focus not on those crooked ways your traveling but to those colorful flowers and green living along the way.... i realy love the poem

Anonymous said...

This is without doubt, my favourite every poem. Not a great lover of poetry but this one is different somehow....

Anonymous said...

this is my fav poem in the wholeeee world(:

Anonymous said...

I hope that you are ok "Anonymous said". It's good that you can appreciate this poem. But you must look beyond that. Life is precious and what makes you sad you need to not let bother you. Memories are fine, just don't dwell on anything because it can over power you. Self Actualization. I love you and god bless.

Anonymous said...

i just wanna say that i love this poem so much that i can give my life for it

Jusitn said...

This poem is awesome!!! im doing an assignment on it right now in Language 10!

ill say it again this is a beautiful poem

Anu said...

this poem ,I think I studied in my tenth class.From there onwards,whenever I had to do a lot of hardwork and when I miss some of the most beautiful things in life,I remember this poem.Then I will come out of all the 'missing' feelings and reassures myself about the blessings of god who made me capable of doing wonderful things.And I repeat it several times "The woods are lovely......but I have promises to keep...and miles to go before I sleep" and becomes happy

Anonymous said...

mj 68i8t6k96

Matthew Yu said...

Matthew Yu,

Brilliant in every way

Anonymous said...

Stopping by Woods and Road not Taken have helped me with my battle against alcoholism. Miles to go before I sleep,I do not want to die drunk,The road not taken, I am on the right road now and it has made all the difference! clean and sober 3 years, I made a trip out east to Derry what an experience.

الاندرويد said...

absolutely impressive and sensitive

wardah said...

this poem was given to us as a class project and i just thought it as a normal poem. But its absolutely wonderful! It really touched my heart!

Silkworms Ink said...

Some thoughts on the poem here:

http://silkwormsink.blogspot.com/2010/12/snow-poetry-woods-for-trees.html

Anonymous said...

it is beautful

Anonymous said...

,..^_^
<3

Anonymous said...

This is a great poem. When I read it, it makes me feel good. The nature in the winter. Everywhere is snow. You are alone at a nice place and around you is silence. Joyful silence in the silence I can hear god`s soft voice and I can feel that he is closed to me.

PollyWogsBlog said...

I've read this poem in college, among a group of students in south florida that had never experienced snow...I had to explain the feeling of snow to them. Well I looked up this poem today as the temperatures here in my mountain town hit -30F, and someone emailed me to ask how that felt. When I reread the poem today, I thought Frost was looking at his life, and looking forward to his final rest...but the snap of cold and reality that he has a life to finish keeps him going. One guy's take on "...Stopping by Woods.."

perlunya web komunitas event organizer said...

Aw, this was a really great post. In theory I'd like to write like this also - taking time and real effort to make a good article... but what can I say... I procrastinate alot and never seem to get something done.

d s r raju, Vizag said...

Jawaharlal Nehru had this poem on his work desk during his lost days. Mostly remembered for his jouncing gait,he became a virtual wreck after the border skirmishes with China in 1962 and he never recovered wholly in body and spirit. Perhaps this great poem did its bit by lightening the burden of his soul.

Anonymous said...

A very logical poem, you can't easily get the message of the poem to the readers.,.but the plot or the story is easily to understand, a man who riding in a horse stopped on the woods in the snowy evening, he tempted to stay the downing flakes of snow in the deep dark night. but for the reason that he has a promise he continued his journey for miles before he will sleep. actually for my analysis and imaginary reading this poem is all about the journey of life. sometimes if we are tired risking the challenges of life we rest and set aside, in setting aside we sometimes cope into our mind that the death is the best solution to end up the sufferings.,. the woods in a snowy evening represents death in this poem.,.but because he has many obligations in life and promises to fulfill he continue his journey of life, he must go on and leave the temptation of death because a miles away before he sleep, or he will rest forever...

Anonymous said...

there is a interpretation of this poem also it said to be that the man travelling in the darkest evening of the year(from dec. 1 to 23) is no other than Santa Claus. his little horse is the reindeer. he tempted to stay and watch the snow flakes but he must go on for he has promises keep, he must send his gifts to the children waiting for his come. and he will sleep miles before because he will travel long

perlunya web komunitas event organizer said...

there is a interpretation of this poem also it said to be that the man travelling in the darkest evening of the year(from dec. 1 to 23) is no other than Santa Claus. his little horse is the reindeer. he tempted to stay and watch the snow flakes but he must go on for he has promises keep

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Anonymous said...

what do the woods symbolize?

Anonymous said...

Woods symbolize life anonymous
Can anyone teel me what point the peot is trying to get across?

mukesh.dabhi said...

my fav. poem.

--mukesh

ainah mai said...

The poem talks about the man who is alone so that no one can see him. There is nothing there and no one can stop him if he will do something bad to himself. He maybe he is in the saddest part of his life and he is in a deep pain. He may think not to harm himself but because of a very deep depression he did decided to commit suicide. The theme of the story is suicide, the word sleep may represent death in the poem.

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komodo-island-is-new-7-wonders-of-world said...

Your explanation of Frost's poem was great, "Stoping by Woods on a Snowy
Evening." Makes sense to me. He just stopped by on his way to the store. He
knew who the woods belonged to

madinah said...

man is just there. Me? I have a feeling that this man is wondering about his
journey through life. He might be wondering what might happen after 6 or 10
years from now. I know you can interpret a poem into many meanings, but I have
to connect it to a book called the Outsiders. Please help if you can, thanks.

ruang imajinasi said...

journey through life. He might be wondering what might happen after 6 or 10
i like it

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Video Games Stores said...

One of my favorite poem by Robert Frost is "the road not taken."

Amikom.us Tempat Belanja Hosting Murah said...

man is just there. Me? I have a feeling that this man is wondering about his
journey through life. He might be wondering what might happen after 6 or 10
years from now. I know you can interpret a poem into many meanings, but I have
to connect it to a book called the Outsiders. Please help if you can, thanks...

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Anonymous said...

Sleep = Death

radio streaming murah | adioke said...

I have never read this poem, but I am on this web site looking for the
author, which is obviously Rboert Frost. My teacher Mrs. L. Elliott AMS gives me and
my class door trivia,

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